Growing Nostalgic "Old Roses"
In Your Garden

By Simonetta Jensen

In the 18th Century, the practice of tending rose bushes was popular and a handy source for young men to offer as gifts during courtship. These roses were not only beautiful to admire and richly fragrant but also highly symbolic of an unwritten and often unspoken language between admirers. In ancient times, some even believed that these roses contained medicinal properties. Most of these "old roses" came from hardy shrubs that required moderate tending. Today's "old rose" varieties are also for the most part hardy but require consistent attention before you'll achieve a seasoned gardener's level of perfection.

The category of "old roses" is from a hardy stock of rose bushes and climbers that were popular in the Victorian age. Most of these Victorian-age roses were imported from varieties that were first grown in Greece and Persia during the 15th Century. These aromatic roses are still highly popular in today's gardens since they grow well in several zones and don't require the same highly detailed attention as many hybrid roses.

To select an "old rose" for your garden, begin by examining your garden area and figuring out what roses work in that area. For instance, some "old roses" bushes work best as hedges while others prefer to crawl low as bed covers. Many climbers first look like small bushes but climb well up patios, sides of homes, and fences. Some other factors to think about when picking and arranging "old roses" are drainage, sunlight, shading, and insects. Most "old roses" must be watered very frequently on a daily basis. Sunlight is needed for about five hours a day for most "old rose" shrubs

About The Author Copyright 2005 Simonetta Jensen. All rights reserved. Simonetta Jensen is the webmaster and operator of Roses ABC Inc which is a principal resource for information on roses and other flowers on the internet. For more info visit her archive of articles: http://www.rosesabc.com/

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